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The week in pictures

At the beginning of this week we were treated to a stunning sighting of the dominant male in JAWAI walking across the hill in the lovely evening winter light. We believe this male to be abut 9 years old and we have been tracking his behaviour and movements closely in last few months. A bold and interesting character with crystal blue eyes, he certainly eludes a sense of power & strength!

We have started to see a lot more ungulates like these Nilgai increase in numbers over the last few seasons which we put down to some of the positive results of our rewilding projects in the area. Each year during the monsoon season, we plant indigenous grass species & plants which help to sustain the population of these herbivores and others such as wild boar, porcupines, the indian peafowl & button quails amongst others. As some of these animals start to increase in the area, particularly the birds like the quails and the fracolins in turn attract some other species like the Asiatic Wild Cat (also known as the the Desert Cat) as pictured here to come into the area.

Seeing one of these is quite rare around camp and it always makes for a very exciting sighting!

Down on the waters this week, we got to observe a fascinating fight between some greater cormorants who were wrestling it out over a massive fish that one of them had caught!

The bird life has been very busy down on the waters in the last few weeks. Here some whistling ducks flying into land at the JAWAI waters.

This time of year brings clear crispy skies and beautiful sunsets at JAWAI. Each day these incredible views inspire us, bringing daily perspective, daily appreciation for this magical landscape we are lucky enough to call home.

To round up the week we got spend some quality time with these curious adolescent cubs. They are getting braver and more inquisitive each day and are great fun to watch and observe as they grow up here at Jawai. Their mother has done well to keep both cubs alive, especially with the dominant male lurking in the area.

Images by Vedant Thite & Shanterham Pai.

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